Principles of Contracts: Material Interest

—- —– Previous chapter: You CAN Fight City Hall —- —– I was beginning to think I’d never return to this series. Please bear in mind as you read the following that I am not a lawyer, and none of the below is legal advice. These are thoughts on business … Continue reading

Bruce’s Law and the Future of The Arts

Excitement. That’s the first thing that happens when disruption hits an industry. A world of possibility opens up and the future gets brighter than a supernova. At the same time comes the fear—something of such power will upend everything we know, and maybe the wrong people will wind up winning. … Continue reading

Released: Making Tracks

Some of you might have run across the sneaky early e-book release already, but this is the official announcement. Over the last few years, on this blog and elsewhere, I’ve gotten a lot of questions from authors and podcasters and other people wanting to either get into the audio habit … Continue reading

Why the Flight to Amazon?

Before I start, I should make something plain: I like Amazon–they’ve been incredibly, uncharacteristically work-with-able on a level that’s unprecedented in the publishing industry. I am delighted to have my books available in their store, I’ve had an excellent time working with CreateSpace for POD books, and very much enjoyed … Continue reading

Principles of Contracts: You CAN Fight City Hall

Because this one deals a lot with the law again, the usual disclaimers apply: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice. This is one man’s opinion on how business is done. Always consult a qualified legal professional when seeking legal advice. — — — — Previous chapter: … Continue reading

Dropbox: Credit is Due

Well, everyone, it looks like Dropbox has listened. They’ve rewritten their TOS in a way that is very sensible, does not use loaded legal terminology that would allow an unscrupulous employee or future company administration to do a little snatch-and-grab with your intellectual property, and is layperson readable. I call … Continue reading

Google Pulls a Dropbox

Apologies to those who are already tired of this–it’s threatening to become a hobby horse. Looks like with Google+, Google is going where every stupid lawyer has gone before: claiming “a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute … Continue reading